You have a game (or any program) that you want to install. It could be a new game on DVD or an old game on CD. You insert the disc into the drive to install the game and nothing happens. You can, of course, explore the disc, find the setup file and run it but it’s more convenient when the program runs automatically. If it doesn’t run automatically then “Autoplay” is not working and should be fixed. The steps below are for Windows 10 and Windows 7.

 

1) Set Autoplay Settings

Windows 10 and Windows 7:

  1. If you are using Windows 10
    1. Type “Control Panel” into the search bar next to the Windows 10 logo. Before you finish typing, “Control Panel app” should appear in a list above the search bar
    2. Press Enter or click Control Panel app to open the Control Panel window
  2. If you are using Windows 7
    1. Click the Start button
    2. Click “Control Panel” to open the Control Panel window
  3. Near the top right of the window, set “View by:” to Category
  4. Click “Hardware and Sound” in the left column
  5. Click Autoplay near the top of the list
  6. Scroll to the bottom of the window
  7. Click “Reset all defaults” in the bottom left corner as shown on the right
  8. Scroll to the top of the window.
  9. Make sure “Use AutoPlay for all media and devices” on the left is checked
  10. On the left side of the window are listed many types of CDs and DVDs. Next to each category is a drop-down menu where you tell Windows what you want it to do when that type of CD/DVD is inserted. Find “Software and games” at the bottom of the list as shown on the right
  11. Set its drop-down menu to “Install or run program from your media”

 

2) Edit the Registry – Part 1

If it still doesn’t work there is either corruption in the Windows registry or the registry settings don’t agree with the Control Panel settings. Since the registry settings have higher priority than Control Panel, whatever you do in Control Panel is being ignored. To fix Autoplay you need to edit the registry. Be careful when editing the registry since making incorrect changes can cause your computer to become unusable. If you do not feel comfortable editing the registry, do not perform these instructions. Instead, take your computer to a qualified person to have Autoplay fixed.

Before proceeding, skim through the rest of the article. Note that there are 2 registry solutions to the problem (sections 2 and 3) which should be performed in order. Also, before making any changes to the registry, you will make a backup of the entire registry (shown in red text). If you make a mistake editing the registry causing Windows to be unable to load the next time you boot, you will need to follow the instructions entitled “If Windows won’t load because the registry is damaged” after section 3. That means you need a hard copy of those instructions so you can refer to them. Using your mouse, select the instructions. Copy and paste them into a word processor such as Word or Word Perfect and then print them. Do this now, before proceeding.

Windows 10 and Windows 7:

You are looking for 2 key fields:

 

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer

 

Each keyfield has an entry called “NoDriveTypeAutoRun”. You need to set “NoDriveTypeAutoRun” to a hexadecimal value of “91” in each of the above key fields.

 

  1. If you are using Windows 10
    1. Click in the search bar next to the Windows 10 logo
  2. If you are using Windows 7
    1. Click the Windows Start button
  3. Type “regedit” and press Enter
  4. If you get a window with a message asking if you want the Registry Editor to make changes to your computer, click Yes. In Windows 7 the message is “Do you want to allow the following program to make changes to this computer”. In Windows 10 the message is “Do you want to allow this app to make changes to your device”. In either case, “Registry Editor” is displayed below the message
  5. The registry editor should now be open
  6. First, backup your registry to the desktop
    1. Click the File menu at the top left of the window
    2. Click Export to open the “Export Registry File” window shown on the right
    3. For the file name enter today’s date with hyphens separating the month, day and year: eg. 03-27-17. Using the current date as the file name is useful if there is another registry backup on the desktop. This way, you know which one is the most recent
    4. For “Save in” at the top of the window, select the desktop so the backup will be easy to find if necessary
    5. Click Save to save a backup of the registry to the desktop
    6. Make sure that you can see the registry backup on your desktop. It would appear as the icon shown on the right 
  7. The registry is HUGE. It contains information about every piece of hardware and software in your computer. The editor is divided into 2 panes. The left pane is a hierarchy of key fields – a structure similar to a multi-level folder structure (folders within folders within folders…). There are 5 root keys:
    1. HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT
    2. HKEY_CURRENT_USER
    3. HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE
    4. HKEY_USERS
    5. HKEY_CURRENT_CONFIG
  8. Scroll to the top of the left pane
  9. If a root key has a black triangle to the left of it, click it to collapse the root key. Do this for all 5 root keys
  10. The left pane of the editor should now display only the 5 root keys as shown on the right
  11. Look again at the 2 key fields mentioned near the beginning of section 2. The first one starts with “HKEY_CURRENT_USER”. I will refer to this key field as Root 1. Find the root key “HKEY_CURRENT_USER” in the editor’s left pane
  12. Expand it by clicking the triangle to the left of it. The contents of the root key are listed in alphabetical order
  13. Refer again to Root 1, above. After “HKEY_CURRENT_USER” is a series of subkeys separated by backslashes. The first one is “Software” followed by “Microsoft”. In the editor, find the subkey “Software” under “HKEY_CURRENT_USER” and expand it by clicking the triangle to the left of it
  14. Find the subkey “Microsoft” under “Software” and expand it by clicking the triangle to the left of it. In Windows 10, the current key field is displayed near the top of the Registry Editor window, underneath the menu bar, as shown on the right. In Windows 7, the current key field is displayed at the bottom of the Registry Editor window.
  15. Continue referring to Root 1, above. Find each subkey in the editor, one by one, and expand it until the current key field matches Root 1:
    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer
    .
  16. Click on the final subkey, “Explorer”, to highlight it
  17. The contents of “Explorer” are listed in the right pane. Look for “NoDriveTypeAutoRun” and double-click it
    1. Ensure “Base” is set to “Hexadecimal” not “Decimal”
    2. Enter “91” without quotes in the “Value data” text box
    3. Click OK
  18. Repeat the above steps for the 2nd key field mentioned at the start of section 2 and then close the Registry editor
  19. For this solution to work, “NoDriveTypeAutoRun” needs to be in both key fields. If it is missing from either key field, move on to section 3

 

3) Edit the Registry – Part 2

Windows 10 and Windows 7:

  1. “NoDriveTypeAutoRun” needs to be deleted from both key fields. It might currently exist in both, neither or only 1 of the 2 key fields. Locate both key fields by following the instructions from section 2. If “NoDriveTypeAutoRun” exists in either of them, select it and press the delete key
  2. Delete “DisableAutoplay” from this key: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\AutoplayHandlers
  3. Close the Registry Editor. Autoplay should now work
  4. After confirming that Autoplay works, delete the registry backup file since you no longer need it

 

If Windows won’t load because the registry is damaged

  1. Reboot the computer
  2. Press F8 repeatedly as the computer boots
  3. From the menu, use the up and down arrow keys to select “Safe mode” and press Enter
  4. After Windows loads in safe mode, click (or double-click depending on how you have Windows configured) the registry backup file that you created and saved on the desktop
  5. In response to “Do you want to allow the following program to make changes to the computer”, click Yes
  6. When asked for confirmation to make changes to the registry, as shown on the right, click Yes
  7. Reboot the computer. Windows should load normally since the registry has been restored to the condition it was in before you edited it
  8. Assuming the problem was never fixed, return to the start of section 2 and try again to fix the problem

 

4) Check Shell Hardware Detection Service

  1. If you are using Windows 10
    1. Click in the search bar next to the Windows 10 logo
  2. If you are using Windows 7
    1. Click the Windows Start button
  3. Type services and press Enter to load the Services window shown on the right
  4. Information is organized in rows and columns. Click on any row and press the “S” key on the keyboard to go to the first entry starting with “S”
  5. Scroll down to “Shell Hardware Detection”
    .
  6. Double-click “Shell Hardware Detection” to open the “Shell Hardware Detection Properties” window. For the following instructions, refer to the window on the right
  7. Find “Startup type” on the left side of the window
  8. Use the drop-down menu to set the startup type to Automatic
  9. Find “Service status” on the left side of the window.
  10. Next to “Service status:”, you should see “Running”. If “Running” is not displayed next to “Service status:”, click the “Start” button underneath “Service status” to start the service.
  11. Click OK to save the changes

 

 

 

5) Unplug USB Devices

This one is a bit of a long shot. Apparently, USB devices can sometimes stop Autoplay from working. So, try unplugging all USB devices.

 

Hopefully, one of these solutions worked for you.

 

 

Click here to go to the next troubleshooting page “Choppy Animation, Freezing or Graphical Distortion”.

 

 

5 Responses

  1. admin

    Every now and then, some part of Windows breaks. Maybe the sound quits or your printer stops working. I have used this solution to fix Autoplay twice in the 2.5 years that I have owned my computer. The last time was recently and section 3 of the solution fixed the problem.

  2. Furkan

    When I deleted “NoDriveTypeAutoRun”, it worked perfectly. However, locating them was a bit tricky and thanks for your help. You helped a lot.

  3. Maurice Jackson

    I do not know how many times I ran across this problem only to discard the game altogether. I just assumed it was an unfixable issue. because of the age of the game or damage to the disc itself. Your suggestion for resolving the issue sounds like a simple fix to start. But it is not resolved in the first couple of steps, then it is way over my head to even try.

    • admin

      Even if you don’t feel comfortable editing the registry, at least you know it’s a fixable problem. You can then take your computer somewhere to have autoplay fixed.

Leave a Reply