My favourite game franchise is the Gothic franchise: three full games and two add-ons. “Gothic” was followed by “Gothic 2” and then the add-on “Gothic 2 – The Night of the Raven” (NOTR). All three games were developed by Piranha Bytes. Other games followed in the series but they aren’t as good as the first three. This is a spoiler-free but thorough review of Gothic. After the Gothic game review, I briefly discuss Gothic 2. Since nearly everything that I say about Gothic also applies to Gothic 2, I will not be repeating the information when discussing Gothic 2. I will only mention things about Gothic 2 that are different from the original game. I will also apply this strategy when I briefly discuss Gothic 2 – The Night of the Raven.

 

 

Gothic

Introduction

Gothic is an open-world RPG. You can play as a warrior, ranger or mage or any combination of the three. The game came out in 2001, 6 months before The Elder Scrolls III – Morrowind. Massive with great graphics for the time and hundreds of quests, Morrowind received widespread acclaim along with many awards and nominations. In this review, I am going to compare Gothic to Morrowind.

Morrowind doesn’t do everything in the best way possible. My biggest Morrowind complaints fall into the following three categories: dialogue, combat animation and unrealistic NPCs. Other issues include travelling and the operation of doors and windows.

First, there is almost no spoken dialogue in Morrowind. When you have a conversation with someone, a list of dialogue options appears on your screen. You click on one and then you read the other character’s reply. This might be followed by another list of options. My second complaint is that the combat animation is not very good. When you swing your sword, axe or other weapon, your character takes only a very short swing. For an overhead strike, the animation stops when the weapon hits the target’s head. For a strike across the torso (right-to-left or left-to-right), the animation stops when the weapon makes contact with the body. So each strike is very short; there’s no follow-through.

My third complaint is that the game’s NPCs are unrealistic because they don’t give the appearance of having lives. Most characters have a routine that never varies; they’re in the same place every time you encounter them. My fourth complaint involves travelling. Whenever the hero traveled somewhere, a “Loading” screen would appear every few seconds. These Loading screens were annoying interruptions. Since Morrowind was a demanding game for the time, the Loading screens may have been caused by inadequate hardware; a modern computer might not have this issue.

My final complaint involves the operation of doors and windows. When you enter or exit a building, the door doesn’t open. Instead, you teleport from inside to outside or vice versa. You also can’t look through windows. When inside a building, for example, you can’t look through a window to see people outside. This is because, in Morrowind, the entire outside is a single map and the inside of each structure is also a single map and you can’t look from one map to another.

 

Dialogue and Music

Unlike Morrowind, Gothic has spoken dialogue throughout the entire game and the voice acting is beyond excellent. It is truly outstanding and the game’s best feature. The NPCs are lively and have many things to say. There are also many different accents and several of the characters are very funny. Some characters are so funny they will make you laugh out loud, others will annoy you like crazy and others you will learn to hate. The voice acting is the best of any game I’ve ever played.

Gothic also contains many excellent musical compositions that play at different points in the game.

 

Combat System and Animation

The combat system in Gothic puts you in control over how you fight. You have different strikes to choose from and can put them together in combinations however you like. The coordination of the keyboard and mouse makes the combat system difficult to manage at first. It takes some getting used to but with practice you’ll find that it’s not so difficult.

The combat animation in Gothic is excellent. I always use only 1-handed swords because the animation is so good. When the player’s character swings a sword, the animation doesn’t stop when the sword makes contact with the enemy. If your character swings a sword from right to left (forehand), the animation continues until the sword is on the left side of the character.

At this point your character can swing his sword from left to right (backhand), bringing the sword back to the right side. The strikes are very fluid, flowing from one strike to the next. When fighting an enemy you can repeat this motion – forehand, backhand, forehand, backhand – as many times as you want. The animation is excellent. It’s very smooth and very realistic – much better than in Morrowind.

To get the most out of Gothic you need to learn the Gothic fighting technique. Once you’ve received some training, go somewhere private and practice. It’s all about timing. Watch your character closely and only click the mouse when your character is ready for the next strike. Clicking the mouse too soon will interrupt the sequence and your character will stop moving and remain motionless until you click the mouse again. So, practice in private until you are confident that you understand the timing. When you have a good rhythm going, go and find some low-level enemies to fight. If you don’t learn the fighting technique well, you won’t last long against enemies.

 

Explore and Talk to Everyone

Gothic isn’t an easy game especially if you’re new to RPGs. Take your time, explore, talk to everyone and don’t go wandering around the forests at night. If you see something that looks like it could eat you for breakfast, it can. Don’t approach it until you’re well-armed, well-armored and above all, trained.

 

Realistic Characters

It’s clear that when Gothic was being developed, a lot of effort was put into making it seem like the NPCs had lives. Nearly every NPC has a home with a bed. During the day, nearly every NPC does several different things. There’s a lot of variety. Some NPCs might start the day cooking meat on a campfire while others make repairs to their homes. NPCs that are vendors begin selling their merchandise while others gather in small groups to make meaningless conversation.

After a while, many NPCs will go somewhere to do something else. In the evenings, the vendors are no longer selling their wares and can be found elsewhere. Some NPCs can be found in the bar in the evenings while others gather around campfires. At a certain time at night, which varies a lot, most NPCs go to their homes. Some might go to sleep immediately while others sit in a chair for a while before going to bed. Some NPCs remain at the bar until very late. This varied and realistic behaviour of the NPCs adds a lot of realism to Gothic.

 

Travelling and “Doors and Windows”

When travelling in Gothic, there are no “Loading” screens of any kind. The graphics is displayed on the screen smoothly, without interruption. Doors and windows function differently in Gothic than in Morrowind. When you enter or exit a building, the door opens. This is because, in Gothic, the entire outside and inside of all above-ground buildings is a single map. You can enter a building, leave the door open and then look through the open doorway to see outside. If you’re inside a building, you can also look through windows to see outside. These are minor issues but they both add to the realism of the game. This is one example of why I think Gothic is more advanced than Morrowind at the design level.

 

Graphics

The main complaint with Gothic is the graphics. The game is old and the graphics are very dated. However, there are many mods you can make use of to improve the game. Some improve the graphics while others provide support for widescreen monitors or make the game more stable with modern versions of Windows. Last time I played Gothic, I played at a resolution of 1920 x 1080.

 

DirectX Mod

DirectX is software created by Microsoft. It is part of Windows and is used by games. Occasionally, Microsoft updates DirectX which sometimes results in better graphics for games that are compatible with the new version. There is a special DirectX 11 mod for Gothic, Gothic 2, and Gothic 2 – Night of the Raven. Instructions for downloading and installing the mod are given later in this article.

 

Known Issues
These are some of the graphical issues you may encounter while using the DX11 mod:

  • You may occasionally get a black screen after playing for a little while, sometimes while saving your game. Don’t worry if you were saving your game when this happened, this is not a crash so your save data will be fine, but the game will need to be forcefully closed and restarted.
  • Some of the trees have incorrect collisions and you may walk in to invisible walls when walking near certain trees, but I didn’t find this to be too gamebreaking or annoying, just something to be aware of.
  • In underground levels such as mines and temples you may get a really annoying bug where you’re able to see through walls at a certain distance, but not when you get closer.
  • Some players have reported that when it is raining in game, save files can get corrupted. If you want to ensure this does not happen, you will need to set skyEffects=0 in your Gothic\System\Gothic.ini file – however this will mean you have no rain or other sky effects.

Troubleshooting
You may not be able to get the DirectX 11 mod to run on your system, but before you give up, try these things as they have helped some people:

  • Unplug/disable all but your main monitor.
  • Even though you are running the executable, try disabling Steam overlay for the game.
  • If the game crashes on load, try it again, it may just be having trouble with the intial resolution.
  • Be sure the game is running in your native resolution, both in the gothic.ini file and in the in-game options menu.

 

What Does Gothic Have that Other Games Don’t?

Evolving Combat Animation

Gothic was ahead of its time in a way that is not seen with most modern games – the combat animation changes as your character learns. Besides the sequel to Gothic and the sequel’s add-on, I’ve played very few games where the combat animation gets more advanced as your character learns. For example, when you start the game, your character doesn’t know how to swing a sword properly. Whenever he swings a sword, there is an animation sequence that clearly shows his lack of experience.

When your character receives level 1 training, the trainer instructs him how to properly swing a sword. After training, the combat animation is different because your character has learned how to swing a sword properly. The animation actually reflects exactly what the trainer said during training. After receiving level 2 training, the animation changes again. It is now longer and more complex because the character has been trained to the highest level. Besides Gothic 2 and Gothic 2 – The Night of the Raven, I know of only one other game that does this. It shows the effort that was put into Gothic to make it as realistic as possible.

 

Realistic NPCs that Have Lives

As said earlier, Gothic’s NPCs seem to have lives because they behave in a realistic manner with a lot of variety in their daily routines. This is not the case in  many other RPGs where NPCs have little to no purpose and walk around aimlessly. For example, in some games I have played, NPCs in a town might walk from one location to another only to turn around immediately and walk back. That’s all these NPCs do – walk back and forth between 2 points for no reason at all. This is done in an attempt to make the town seem lively but the lack of variety in their routines detracts from the game’s realism.

Also, NPCs often don’t seem to have homes; they’re not asleep in a bed at night. The NPCs in Gothic have lives and this adds to the realism of the game. At no time will you find NPCs walking back and forth aimlessly between 2 points. Pictured on the right is a Gothic NPC sitting in his hut in the evening before going to bed.

 

Objects in the Environment the Player can Interact with

The player can interact with many objects in the game. Many of these aren’t important but there are some that are quite useful and make the game more enjoyable. There are also some that are quite important as they give you a way to earn the game’s equivalent of money.

 

Replayability

You have several options for the type of character you want to create. In addition to being able to play as any combination of warrior, ranger or mage, Gothic has three factions and you are free to join whichever one you want. As a member of a particular faction your character will wear the armour of that faction for most of the game. Also, in the first part of the game, there are some quests that are faction-specific – they can only be done by members of a particular faction. The above options and faction-specific quests provide the game with significant replayability.

 

Conclusion

When it was released, Gothic was ahead of its time featuring voice acting for the entire game. The game has a good story with several funny characters – outstanding voice acting is actually the game’s best feature. To enjoy this game you need two things: patience and mastery of the Gothic fighting technique. If you don’t possess these two items, you won’t last very long. The combat animation is better than many much newer games, the NPCs behave in a realistic manner and the music is also very good. The graphics are now very dated but mods help a lot. If you look past the graphics, Gothic is a great RPG.

 

 

Gothic 2

Gothic is a great game but I prefer Gothic 2. While Gothic 2 doesn’t have the humor of the original, I find its game-world more interesting. Gothic 2 begins where Gothic leaves off. Once again, the game is open-world and you can choose from many options of how to play. Both the music and voice acting are excellent. The graphics are better than the original but still dated. However, as before, you can make use of mods to improve the graphics considerably and provide widescreen support. Everything I said in my review for Gothic, except for the many funny characters, also applies to Gothic 2.

The game-world of Gothic 2 is extremely well designed. There are many interesting places in a relatively small but carefully crafted game-world filled with secrets. This makes Gothic 2 a lot of fun to explore. There’s something different around every corner in Gothic 2. Gothic 2, like the original, is not an easy game. It’s harder than the original; some people find it quite difficult.

To enjoy this game you need the same items you need to play the original Gothic: patience and mastery of the Gothic fighting technique. Since Gothic 2 is harder than the original, possessing these two items is even more important than for the original game.

 

 

Gothic 2 – Night of the Raven

This is my favourite RPG and my favourite game of all time. In response to requests from fans, the developer released Gothic 2 – Night of the Raven (NOTR). Nearly everything I said about Gothic and Gothic 2, except for Gothic’s many funny characters, also applies to NOTR. Although it’s known as an add-on, NOTR is actually a reworking of Gothic 2.

Unlike a typical add-on which is a stand-alone game that you might play after playing the original game, NOTR is a game that you could play instead of playing its predecessor. That’s because, for the most part, NOTR is the same game as Gothic 2. It has the same main quest as Gothic 2 but adds an additional main quest. It also adds a new area to explore with new NPCs, monsters and quests.

NOTR is also harder than Gothic 2; some mid-level and all high-level enemies are harder to kill. Since NOTR is harder than its predecessor, great patience is crucial. This might force you to change your strategy from Gothic 2.

 

 

Download and Install

If you decide to play these games, you can buy them from a game download site. To get the most out of these three games, I suggest you start with the original. It’s the beginning of the story and the easiest game although still not all that easy. Then, play Gothic 2. Only move on to NOTR if you want an even greater challenge than Gothic 2.

 

Download the DirectX 11 mod and other files for all 3 games on the Download page. Instructions for installing all the files on the Download page can be found below.

 

Gothic

Gothic was released in 2001 but is still popular as evidenced by the many mods made for it. Download the official patch (might not be necessary if you buy the game from a game download site as it might be included in the download) as well as mods to improve the graphics, increase stability and provide widescreen support. There’s also a program that modifies the game to make it easier to use mods. Some of these files I only recently discovered and haven’t yet had a chance to try.

 

Instructions:
  1. Install game “GOTHIC”
  2. Install official patch 1.08k – gothic_patch_108k.exe – if needed
  3. Install Community patch 1.0 – g1icp_v1.0_setup.exe
  4. Install Gothic1_PlayerKit-1.08k.exe to the Gothic installation folder
  5. Install Gothic1_PlayerKit-2.8.exe to the Gothic installation folder
  6. Install G1Classic-SystemPack-1.7.exe to the Gothic installation folder
  7. Install textures
    1. Option 1 – This seems to be a collection of the newest textures
      1. Put Carnage_Graphics_patch.VDF in Gothic\Data
      2. Unpack “Texture Pack By Artemiano Gothic I.7z” and put in Gothic\Data
    2. Option 2 – these textures are older than those in option 1
      1. Install Textures_Patch_Freddy-0.8.exe to the Gothic installation folder
      2. Install worlds_patch_freddy-1.01.exe to the Gothic installation folder
      3. Install Gothic_-_ThielHaters_Texturepatch_FINAL.exe to the Gothic installation folder
  8. Unpack DirectX 11 mod (version 17.5) – GD3D11_PreviewReleaseG1.zip – to Gothic\System
  9. Unpack G1_NP_UPDATE.rar to Gothic\System if you installed option 1 above
  10. Play and check size of subtitles
  11. Unpack FONT_High_Resolution_v2.zip to Gothic\Data if subtitles are too small
  12. Play

 

Gothic 2

There is no official patch for Gothic 2. Once again, there are files to download that improve the graphics, increase stability, provide widescreen support and make it easier to use mods.

 

Instructions
  1. Install game “GOTHIC2”
  2. Make a copy of Gothic.exe called Gothic2.exe in Gothic II\System
  3. Install Gothic2_fix-1.30.0.0.exe to the Gothic 2 installation folder
  4. Install Gothic2_Playerkit-2.8.exe to the Gothic 2 installation folder
  5. Install G2Classic-SystemPack-1.7.exe to the Gothic 2 installation folder
  6. Unpack GD3D11_PreviewReleaseG2.zip (version 17.5) to Gothic II\System
  7. Install textures
    1. Unpack Vurt_s_Gothic_II_Graphics_Overhaul.7z texture pack to Gothic II\Data
      or
    2. Put Carnage_Graphics_Patch_G2.VDF in Gothic II\Data
  8. Play

 

Gothic 2 Night of the Raven

As with Gothic 2, there is no official patch for NOTR. Once again, there are files to download that improve the graphics, increase stability, provide widescreen support and make it easier to use mods.

Gothic, Gothic 2 and NOTR have a small but dedicated English-speaking fanbase. From what I’ve read, the games are most popular in Germany, Poland and especially Russia where they have apparently achieved cult status. Most mods for the games discussed in this article are less than 50MB. A few are over 100MB. As of the writing of this review, NOTR is 14 years old, yet people still make content mods for this game. There are four very big content mods for NOTR, some of which were made by teams of passionate fans. Gothic II – L’Hiver EN Edition was made in 2015 and is 783MB. Gothic II – Jason’s L’Hiver ENG Edition is a modified version of the L’Hiver mod. It was made in 2016 and is 1GB. Odyssey was made in 2014 and is 1.76GB. Some of these mods are Russian-made. Fortunately, there are English subtitles that translate the all-Russian dialogue.

Here are the instructions for installing NOTR without a content mod as well as NOTR with L’Hiver, Jason’s L’Hiver and Odyssey.

 

Instructions for NOTR Without a Content Mod
  1. Install game “GOTHIC 2 NOTR”
  2. Make a copy of Gothic.exe called Gothic2.exe in Gothic II\System
  3. Install Gothic2_fix-2.6.0.0-rev2.exe to the Gothic 2 installation folder
  4. Install Gothic2_Playerkit-2.8.exe to the Gothic 2 installation folder
  5. Install G2NoTR-SystemPack-1.7.exe  to the Gothic 2 installation folder
  6. Install GD3D11_PreviewReleaseG2 (version 17.5) to Gothic II\System
  7. Install Crashfix. See here for more info
    1. Make a backup of shw32.dll in GothicII\system (just in case something goes wrong)
    2. Extract contents of ‘Gothic_1_2_mem_fix_v06.zip’
    3. Move the 2 files ‘libhoard.dll’ and ‘Shw32.dll’ in GothicII\system
    4. Extract contents of ‘4gb_patch.rar’
    5. Run ‘4gb_patch.exe’
    6. Select Gothic2.exe (GothicII\system\Gothic2.exe) and press OK
  8. Install a texture pack
    1. Unpack Vurt_s_Gothic_II_Graphics_Overhaul.7z texture pack to Gothic II\Data
      or
    2. Unpack Lhiver_Vurt_Graphics_World_0_9_1.zip texture pack to Gothic II\Data (this is a texture pack but it also modifies the game-world)
  9. Play

 

Instructions for NOTR + L’Hiver EN Edition 
  1. Install game “GOTHIC 2 NOTR”
  2. Make a copy of Gothic.exe called Gothic2.exe in Gothic II\System
  3. Install Gothic2_fix-2.6.0.0-rev2.exe to the Gothic 2 installation folder
  4. Install Gothic2_Playerkit-2.8.exe to the Gothic 2 installation folder
  5. Install G2NoTR-SystemPack-1.7.exe  to the Gothic 2 installation folder
  6. Install GD3D11_PreviewReleaseG2 (version 17.5) to Gothic II\System
  7. Install Crashfix. See here for more info
    1. Make a backup of shw32.dll in GothicII\system (just in case something goes wrong)
    2. Extract contents of ‘Gothic_1_2_mem_fix_v06.zip’
    3. Move the 2 files ‘libhoard.dll’ and ‘Shw32.dll’ in GothicII\system
    4. Extract contents of ‘4gb_patch.rar’
    5. Run ‘4gb_patch.exe’
    6. Select Gothic2.exe (GothicII\system\Gothic2.exe) and press OK
  8. Install L’hiver EN Edition
    1. Unpack G2_LH_Edit_BASE_v1.1.1_EN.zip to Gothic 2 installation folder. Overwrite the files when asked
    2. Unpack 1 of the 2 L’hiver EN Edition script files (G2_LH_Edit_SCRIPTS_v1.1.1_EN.zip or G2_LH_Edit_SCRIPTS_NW_v1.1.1_EN.zip) and put the VDF in GothicII\Data
    3. Unpack HiverMusic.zip in Gothic 2 installation folder if you want L’Hiver music
    4. See here for recommendations after installation
  9. Play

 

Instructions for NOTR + Jason’s L’Hiver Eng Edition 
  1. Install game “GOTHIC 2 NOTR”
  2. Make a copy of Gothic.exe called Gothic2.exe in Gothic II\System
  3. Install Gothic2_fix-2.6.0.0-rev2.exe to the Gothic 2 installation folder
  4. Install Gothic2_Playerkit-2.8.exe to the Gothic 2 installation folder
  5. Install G2NoTR-SystemPack-1.7.exe  to the Gothic 2 installation folder
  6. Install GD3D11_PreviewReleaseG2 (version 17.5) to Gothic II\System
  7. Install Crashfix. See here for more info
    1. Make a backup of shw32.dll in GothicII\system (just in case something goes wrong)
    2. Extract contents of ‘Gothic_1_2_mem_fix_v06.zip’
    3. Move the 2 files ‘libhoard.dll’ and ‘Shw32.dll’ in GothicII\system
    4. Extract contents of ‘4gb_patch.rar’
    5. Run ‘4gb_patch.exe’
    6. Select Gothic2.exe (GothicII\system\Gothic2.exe) and press OK
  8. Install Jason’s L’hiver Eng Edition
    1. Unpack LHiver_Edition_EN_0.9.1a.zip to the Gothic 2 installation folder
  9. Play

 

Instructions for NOTR + Odyssey
  1. Install game “GOTHIC 2 NOTR”
  2. Make a copy of Gothic.exe called Gothic2.exe in Gothic II\System
  3. Install Gothic2_fix-2.6.0.0-rev2.exe to the Gothic 2 installation folder
  4. Install Gothic2_Playerkit-2.8.exe to the Gothic 2 installation folder
  5. Install G2Odyssey-SystemPack-1.7.exe to the Gothic 2 installation folder
  6. Install Odyssee_D3D11_Texturen_v2.exe  to Gothic II\System
  7. Install Crashfix. See here for more info
    1. Make a backup of shw32.dll in GothicII\system (just in case something goes wrong)
    2. Extract contents of ‘Gothic_1_2_mem_fix_v06.zip’
    3. Move the 2 files ‘libhoard.dll’ and ‘Shw32.dll’ in GothicII\system
    4. Extract contents of ‘4gb_patch.rar’
    5. Run ‘4gb_patch.exe’
    6. Select Gothic2.exe (GothicII\system\Gothic2.exe) and press OK
  8. Install Odyssey
    1. Install ODYSSEE-2.4.3.exe to the Gothic 2 installation folder
    2. Install ODYSSEY.2.4.1.EN.exe (English translation patch) to the Gothic 2 installation folder
  9. Play

 

Gothic 2 Gold

Gothic 2 Gold refers to Gothic 2 and Gothic 2 – Night of the Raven packaged together to be sold as a single product. Returning 2.0 is a mod that requires Gothic 2 Gold. It was made in December, 2015 and is a massive 4.36GB. To download Returning you need a torrent downloader. Download “BitTorrent” if you don’t have a torrent downloader already. Returning is a Russian-made mod. Fortunately, there are English subtitles that translate the all-Russian dialogue.

 

Instructions for Gothic 2 Gold + Returning
  1. Install game “GOTHIC 2 Gold”
  2. Make a copy of Gothic.exe called Gothic2.exe in Gothic II\System
  3. Install Gothic2_fix-2.6.0.0-rev2.exe to the Gothic 2 installation folder
  4. Install Gothic2_Playerkit-2.8.exe to the Gothic 2 installation folder
  5. Install G2Returning-SystemPack-1.7.exe to the Gothic 2 installation folder
  6. Install GD3D11_PreviewReleaseG2 (version 17.5) to Gothic II\System
  7. Install Crashfix. See here for more info
    1. Make a backup of shw32.dll in GothicII\system (just in case something goes wrong)
    2. Extract contents of ‘Gothic_1_2_mem_fix_v06.zip’
    3. Move the 2 files ‘libhoard.dll’ and ‘Shw32.dll’ in GothicII\system
    4. Extract contents of ‘4gb_patch.rar’
    5. Run ‘4gb_patch.exe’
    6. Select Gothic2.exe (GothicII\system\Gothic2.exe) and press OK
  8. Install Returning
    1. For installation instructions click on this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZCjjnG483U&ab_channel=SinitarGaming
  9. Play

 

Click here to read a review of Gothic 3.

3 Responses

  1. Peter

    I’m glad that you reviewed Gothic. I love RPGs but I never got around to playing it.

    Indeed, I got sucked into Morrowind instead. I hated its combat but I loved its odd world. The latest Elder Scrolls game, Skyrim fixed most of the problems that you talked about for Morrowind, but you still can’t look in the windows.

    I appreciate the detail at the end of your post about how to find the game and install its patches. That is the kind of walkthrough that old games need if modern gamers are going to give it a chance. Unfortunately, I’m getting too old to mess around with such things. Instead, I will watch a video of someone else playing the game to experience it vicariously.

  2. fernglow

    Hi, I am an avid gamer and I have heard of Gothic from my friends and they described it to be really good so I decided to read about it. I found your article super helpful because it was everything i needed without spoiling everything! Super useful and looking forward to reading your other articles!

  3. Riaz Shah

    Omg omg omg omg FINALLY someone wrote about the Gothic series!

    I grew up playing the first ever Gothic 1,2,3 and I remember the characters well – Diego, Aidan, Whistler, Fletcher, and Dexter. God, it’s been 15 years already!

    I remember that our hero didn’t have a name and they call him the Nameless Hero. And when you first played the game he was like “My name is…” and then Diego stopped him and said “I don’t need to know”.

    Awesome review man, very nostalgic. I’m definitely going to start playing again. 10/10 !

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